Home
Bulletin Letter
St. Paul Home
Calendar
Bulletins
Bulletin Letters
Feb. 12, 2006
Feb. 5, 2006
Jan. 29, 2006
Jan. 22, 2006
Jan. 15, 2006
Jan. 8, 2006
Jan. 1, 2006
Dec. 25, 2005
Dec. 18, 2005
Dec. 11, 2005
Dec. 4, 2005
Nov. 27, 2005
Nov. 20, 2005
Nov. 13, 2005
Nov. 6, 2005
Oct. 30, 2005
Oct. 23, 2005
Oct. 16, 2005
Oct. 9, 2005
Oct. 2, 2005
Sept. 25, 2005
Sept. 18, 2005
Sept. 11, 2005
Aug. 28, 2005
Aug. 21, 2005
Aug. 14, 2005
Aug. 7, 2005
July 31, 2005
July 24, 2005
June 26, 2005
June 19, 2005
June 12, 2005
June 5, 2005
May 29, 2005
May 22, 2005
May 15, 2005
May 8, 2005
May 1, 2005
April 24, 2005
April 17, 2005
April 10, 2005
April 3, 2005
March 27, 2005
March 20, 2005
March 13, 2005
March 6, 2005
Feb. 27, 2005
Feb. 20, 2005
Feb. 13, 2005
Feb. 6, 2005
Jan. 30, 2005
Jan. 23, 2005
Jan 16, 2005
Jan. 9, 2005
Dec. 19, 2004
Dec. 12, 2004
Dec. 5, 2004
Nov. 28, 2004
Nov. 21, 2004
Nov. 14, 2004
Nov. 7, 2004
Oct. 31, 2004
Oct. 24, 2004
Oct. 17, 2004
Oct. 10, 2004
Oct. 3, 2004
Sept. 26, 2004
Sept. 19, 2004
Sept. 12, 2004
Sept.  5, 2004
Aug. 29, 2004
Aug. 22, 2004
Aug. 15, 2004
Aug. 8, 2004
Aug. 1, 2004
July 25, 2004
July 18, 2004
July 11, 2004
July 4, 2004
June 27, 2004
June 13, 2004
June 6, 2004
May 30, 2004
May 23, 2004
May 16, 2004
May 9, 2004
May 2, 2004
April 25, 2004
April 18, 2004
April 11, 2004
April 4, 2004
Mar. 28, 2004
Mar. 21, 2004
Mar. 14, 2004
Mar. 7, 2004
Feb. 29, 2004
Feb. 22, 2004
Feb. 15, 2004
Feb. 8, 2004
Feb. 1, 2004
Jan. 25, 2004
Jan 18, 2004
Jan. 11, 2004
Dec. 28, 2003
Dec. 21, 2003
Dec. 14, 2003
Dec. 7, 2003
Nov. 30, 2003
Nov. 23, 2003
Nov. 16, 2003
Nov. 9, 2003
Nov. 2, 2003
Oct. 26, 2003
Oct. 19, 2003
Oct. 12, 2003
Oct. 5, 2003
Sept. 28, 2003
Sept. 21, 2003
Sept. 14, 2003
Sept. 7, 2003
Aug. 31, 2003
Aug. 24, 2003
Aug. 17, 2003
Aug. 10, 2003
Aug. 3, 2003
July 27, 2003
July 20, 2003
July 13, 2003
June 29, 2003
June 22, 2003
June 15, 2003
June 8, 2003
June 1, 2003
May 25, 2003
May 18, 2003
May 11, 2003
April 27, 2003
April 20, 2003
April 13, 2003
April 6, 2003
March 30, 2003
March 23, 2003
March 16, 2003
March 9, 2003
March 2, 2003
Feb. 23, 2003
Feb. 16, 2003
Feb. 9, 2003
Feb. 2, 2003
Jan. 26, 2003
Jan. 19, 2003
Jan. 12, 2003
Jan. 5, 2003

Pointing at the bulletin letter's date (link) at left will display it's title.
February 19, 2006
Our Heart’s Desire

    This past week we celebrated the feast of St. Valentine.  Although the feast was initially a very simple feast to remind us that love is an important element of life, it has become central to our culture as a time when people take the time and energy to share their feelings for one another.  Although love is not a one day affair, the day has become very symbolic of people’s greatest desires in life.

     Why has Valentine’s Day become so popular?  We could probably blame it on the media or the commercialization of the day and, of course,  those factors  have helped matters considerably.   However, if we give it some thought, we will be forced to admit that the popularity of the day comes from the inside rather than the outside of ourselves.

    There is a strong possibility that Valentine’s Day became such a “success” because it is a means of expressing our innermost feelings and desires without being laughed at or accused of being die hard romantics.  As Americans, our society places a high priority on the work ethic, practicality and simply being reasonable, not to mention the individualistic character we are all encouraged to develop.  But, once a year we are allowed to mellow out and come into contact with our inner feelings.  We can tell everyone we know that we care.  We can spend big money on a romantic dinner, very expensive roses or perhaps an elegant piece of jewelry.  We do not have to excuse ourselves or worry that others will find us extravagant.  It all falls under the umbrella of being romantic and don’t we all appreciate a little romance in our lives once in a while.  

    If the above is true and real to our experience, perhaps there is an important message for us as Christians.  Why do we have such difficulty being faithful to our religious commitments?  Why do we often feel that we need to exert a phenomenal amount of energy to even remember the God who created us and continues to be with us?  Can we learn a lesson from the celebration of Valentine’s Day?   Perhaps we are missing a very important component in our faith lives. It could be that, over the centuries, the idea of God being a part of our innermost desire has simply vanished.  Instead, we have replaced God in our hearts with a God that has simply become an intellectual factor in our lives. 

    As human beings we have been blessed with the ability to feel and to express emotion.  Although this gift often causes us great pain, it also gives us some of the most wonderful moments of our life.  Love was probably never meant to be solely a rational and intellectual proposition.  A relationship that remains in the head is hardly a human relationship.  If falls flat of its beauty and expression and consequently, it often dies. 

    Where, then, does our relationship with God lie?  If God is not one of our innermost desires, why isn’t he?  Have we allowed our God to enter our hearts?  Is God stuck in our minds?  Could we take some time to open that door in the near future?  Wouldn’t our faith life be all the more rich if we took the time to get to know God from the heart?

Lorette P. Nault