Home
Bulletin Letter
St. Paul Home
Calendar
Bulletins
Bulletin Letters
Mar. 19, 2006
Mar. 12, 2006
Mar. 5, 2006
Feb. 26, 2006
Feb. 19, 2006
Feb. 12, 2006
Feb. 5, 2006
Jan. 29, 2006
Jan. 22, 2006
Jan. 15, 2006
Jan. 8, 2006
Jan. 1, 2006
Dec. 25, 2005
Dec. 18, 2005
Dec. 11, 2005
Dec. 4, 2005
Nov. 27, 2005
Nov. 20, 2005
Nov. 13, 2005
Nov. 6, 2005
Oct. 30, 2005
Oct. 23, 2005
Oct. 16, 2005
Oct. 9, 2005
Oct. 2, 2005
Sept. 25, 2005
Sept. 18, 2005
Sept. 11, 2005
Aug. 28, 2005
Aug. 21, 2005
Aug. 14, 2005
Aug. 7, 2005
July 31, 2005
July 24, 2005
June 26, 2005
June 19, 2005
June 12, 2005
June 5, 2005
May 29, 2005
May 22, 2005
May 15, 2005
May 8, 2005
May 1, 2005
April 24, 2005
April 17, 2005
April 10, 2005
April 3, 2005
March 27, 2005
March 20, 2005
March 13, 2005
March 6, 2005
Feb. 27, 2005
Feb. 20, 2005
Feb. 13, 2005
Feb. 6, 2005
Jan. 30, 2005
Jan. 23, 2005
Jan 16, 2005
Jan. 9, 2005
Dec. 19, 2004
Dec. 12, 2004
Dec. 5, 2004
Nov. 28, 2004
Nov. 21, 2004
Nov. 14, 2004
Nov. 7, 2004
Oct. 31, 2004
Oct. 24, 2004
Oct. 17, 2004
Oct. 10, 2004
Oct. 3, 2004
Sept. 26, 2004
Sept. 19, 2004
Sept. 12, 2004
Sept.  5, 2004
Aug. 29, 2004
Aug. 22, 2004
Aug. 15, 2004
Aug. 8, 2004
Aug. 1, 2004
July 25, 2004
July 18, 2004
July 11, 2004
July 4, 2004
June 27, 2004
June 13, 2004
June 6, 2004
May 30, 2004
May 23, 2004
May 16, 2004
May 9, 2004
May 2, 2004
April 25, 2004
April 18, 2004
April 11, 2004
April 4, 2004
Mar. 28, 2004
Mar. 21, 2004
Mar. 14, 2004
Mar. 7, 2004
Feb. 29, 2004
Feb. 22, 2004
Feb. 15, 2004
Feb. 8, 2004
Feb. 1, 2004
Jan. 25, 2004
Jan 18, 2004
Jan. 11, 2004
Dec. 28, 2003
Dec. 21, 2003
Dec. 14, 2003
Dec. 7, 2003
Nov. 30, 2003
Nov. 23, 2003
Nov. 16, 2003
Nov. 9, 2003
Nov. 2, 2003
Oct. 26, 2003
Oct. 19, 2003
Oct. 12, 2003
Oct. 5, 2003
Sept. 28, 2003
Sept. 21, 2003
Sept. 14, 2003
Sept. 7, 2003
Aug. 31, 2003
Aug. 24, 2003
Aug. 17, 2003
Aug. 10, 2003
Aug. 3, 2003
July 27, 2003
July 20, 2003
July 13, 2003
June 29, 2003
June 22, 2003
June 15, 2003
June 8, 2003
June 1, 2003
May 25, 2003
May 18, 2003
May 11, 2003
April 27, 2003
April 20, 2003
April 13, 2003
April 6, 2003
March 30, 2003
March 23, 2003
March 16, 2003
March 9, 2003
March 2, 2003
Feb. 23, 2003
Feb. 16, 2003
Feb. 9, 2003
Feb. 2, 2003
Jan. 26, 2003
Jan. 19, 2003
Jan. 12, 2003
Jan. 5, 2003

Pointing at the bulletin letter's date (link) at left will display it's title.
March 26, 2006
Music Moves Our Soul

Music is the universal language.  The simple and obvious reason for this is that is moves us all at our core regardless of the country it originates from.  We do not need to learn the language of the composer to hear, understand or feel the rhythm, the beat, the soul message it relates.  Of course, there are different types of music and some of us like a particular type more than an another. Within the universal language there is something for everyone.

What exactly does music do for us?  On one level it serves as a means of entertainment.  On another level,  we listen to music simply because we cannot tolerant the silence in our lives.  Silence often makes us feel alone and lonely so we listen to music or the television for “noise”. On yet another level it enables us to release some physical energy.  Sometimes we are full of energy and we need to move.  Moving or dancing to music enables us to do this.

On a deeper level however, music touches us at our core.  If we are truly attentive to the music we listen to and allow ourselves to enter into its depths, music has the ability to touch our soul.  Music, well done, can move us to tears, whether of sorrow or joy.  None of this can happen however if the person listening does not allow him/herself to be touched.  When we listen to music or actually participate in the playing or singing of music, we need to allow our emotions to be touched.  Otherwise nothing will happen.  If we go to a concert and do not enter into the music we may find the evening very long indeed.

Church music is a style of music all its own.  Nonetheless it is part of the universal language and it certainly has the ability to touch us at our core.  Some of the greatest musicians have written beautiful music for church celebrations and that same music continues to be appreciated even in the 21st century.

The Church uses music to help the people have a fuller, deeper experience of the liturgical celebration.  Music is that element that allows us to be touched with our entire being. When we sing or listen to the music, we engage in an activity that has the potential to lift us to the heights or depths of our being.  We can experience joy, sorrow, pain or elation.  We can express love, passion in service, deep gratitude etc.    

Why then, is the music at Mass so “dead”?  There are many reasons for this.  Some people claim they do not have a good singing voice.  Some seem to think that the music simply distracts them from praying.  Still others think that the music element of the Mass should be performed rather than participated in.  And, of course, there are a number of people who see the music as an element of “entertainment” while at Mass.  There are those who would like the music to provide a source of energy release, etc.    When these things do not happen they become disgruntled. 

Is there a middle ground to all this?  Like everything else in life, the answer is Yes.  Music can be better chosen, better played, better sung.  On the flip side, the people attending Mass must be willing to enter the depths of the music that is chosen to express the themes of the weekly celebration.  If the theme is sorrow or reconciliation the music must relate to the theme.

Lorette P. Nault