Home
Bulletin Letter
St. Paul Home
Calendar
Bulletins
Bulletin Letters
May 11, '08
May 4, '08
Apr. 27, '08
Apr. 20, '08
Apr. 13, '08
Apr. 6, '08
Mar. 30, '08
Mar. 23, '08
Mar. 16, '08
Mar. 9, '08
Mar. 2, '08
Fec. 24, '08
Fe. 17, '08
Feb. 10, '08
Feb. 3, '08
Jan. 27, '08
Jan. 20, '08
Jan. 13, '08
Jan. 6, '08
Dec. 23, '07
Dec. 16, '07
Dec. 9, '07
Dec. 2, '07
Nov. 25, '07
Nov. 18, '07
Nov. 11, '07
Nov. 4, '07
Oct. 28, '07
Oct. 21, '07
Oct. 14, '07
Oct. 7, '07
Sept. 30, '07
Sept. 23, '07
Sept. 16, '07
Sept. 9, '07
Sept. 2, '07
Aug. 26, '07
Aug. 19, '07
Aug. 12, '07
Aug. 5, '07
July 29, '07
July 22, '07
July 15, '07
July 8, '07
July 1, '07
June 24, '07
June 17, '07
June 10,  '07
June 3, 2007
May 27, 2007
May 20, 2007
May 13, 2007
May 6, 2007
April 29, 2007
April 22, 2007
April 15, 2007
April 8, 2007
April 1, 2007
Mar. 25, 2007
Mar. 18, 2007
Mar. 11, 2007
Mar. 4, 2007
Feb. 25, 2007
Feb. 18, 2007
Feb. 11, 2007
Feb. 4, 2007
Jan. 21, 2007
Jan 14, 2007
Jan. 7, 2007
Dec. 31, 2006
Dec. 24, 2006
Dec. 17, 2006
Dec. 10, 2006
Dec. 3, 2006
Nov. 26, 2006
Nov. 19, 2006
Nov. 12, 2006
Nov. 5, 2006
Oct. 29, 2006
Oct. 22, 2006
Oct. 15, 2006
Oct. 8, 2006
Oct. 1, 2006
Sept. 24, 2006
Sept. 17, 2006
Sept. 10, 2006
Sept. 3, 2006
Aug. 27, 2006
Aug. 20, 2006
Aug. 13, 2006
Aug. 6, 2006
July 30, 2006
July 23, 2006
July 16, 2006
July 9, 2006
July 2, 2006
June 25, 2006
June 18, 2006
June 11, 2006
June 4, 2006
May 28, 2006
May 21, 2006
May 14, 2006
May 7, 2006
Apr. 30, 2006
Apr. 23, 2006
Apr. 16, 2006
Apr. 9, 2006
Apr. 2, 2006
Mar. 26, 2006
Mar. 19, 2006
Mar. 12, 2006
Mar. 5, 2006
Feb. 26, 2006
Feb. 19, 2006
Feb. 12, 2006
Feb. 5, 2006
Jan. 29, 2006
Jan. 22, 2006
Jan. 15, 2006
Jan. 8, 2006
Jan. 1, 2006
Dec. 25, 2005
Dec. 18, 2005
Dec. 11, 2005
Dec. 4, 2005
Nov. 27, 2005
Nov. 20, 2005
Nov. 13, 2005
Nov. 6, 2005
Oct. 30, 2005
Oct. 23, 2005
Oct. 16, 2005
Oct. 9, 2005
Oct. 2, 2005
Sept. 25, 2005
Sept. 18, 2005
Sept. 11, 2005
Aug. 28, 2005
Aug. 21, 2005
Aug. 14, 2005
Aug. 7, 2005
July 31, 2005
July 24, 2005
June 26, 2005
June 19, 2005
June 12, 2005
June 5, 2005
May 29, 2005
May 22, 2005
May 15, 2005
May 8, 2005
May 1, 2005
April 24, 2005
April 17, 2005
April 10, 2005
April 3, 2005
March 27, 2005
March 20, 2005
March 13, 2005
March 6, 2005
Feb. 27, 2005
Feb. 20, 2005
Feb. 13, 2005
Feb. 6, 2005
Jan. 30, 2005
Jan. 23, 2005
Jan 16, 2005
Jan. 9, 2005

Pointing at the bulletin letter's date (link) at left will display it's title.
May 18, 2008

A Eucharistic Congress - Do We Really Need These?
(Excerpts from theological document for the IECQ)

    Next month, Quebec City will be hosting the 49th International Eucharistic Congress. These gatherings have been a part of the Catholic Church’s life since 1881.  The purpose of such a congress is to give both clergy and layperson alike the opportunity to concentrate and reflect on the most precious gift Catholics hold in truth and in memory, i.e., the real presence of Christ among us. 

    This year’s congress in Quebec City will coincide with the 400th anniversary of the foundation of the first French city in North America, which would become, in the 17th century, an important entry point for missionary activity on the entire continent.  The theme of this year’s congress is “The Eucharist, God’s gift for the life of the world,” echoes the motto of the city which is “God’s gift: make it count.”  The people of the province of Quebec proclaim as their motto:  “I remember”.  This motto reminds us of the mandate that Jesus gave to his apostles at the Last Supper: “Do this in memory of me.”  This Eucharistic Congress will be a privileged event during which we pay homage to this gift of God at the heart of the Christian life and recall the Christian roots of many countries, many of which will be in attendance.

    The theme of the Congress was approved by Pope Benedict XVI.  It is particularly important, today, to remember God’s gift, for, in the midst of remarkable technological progress, notably in the area of communication, our world experiences a deep interior emptiness that it perceives as an absence f God.  We have become so fascinated by our own creative capacities that contemporary humanity tends to forget its Creator and sets itself up as the sole master of its own destiny.  Unfortunately for us, this temptation to put ourselves in God’s place does not serve us well.  It does not succeed in silencing the longing for the infinite that inhabits our depths and the authentic values that we strive to develop even if they risk leading us astray.

    Pope John Paul II reminds us that the death of God in our culture and societies only serves to bring about the eventual “death” of human beings.  We see examples of this process in the currents of nihilistic thought as well as in the conflictual and broken relationships that re multiplying at all levels of human experience, disrupting marriage and the family, multiplying ethnic and social conflicts, and increasing the gulf between the rich and the huge majority who are poor.  World peace is undermined by injustice and misery, and terrorism become the weapon of choice of the desperate.

    Sadly, on a religious level, people today no longer are willing to submit themselves to an authority that dictates their conduct.  They must cope with widespread access to many different beliefs and growing difficulty of handing on to new generations the heritage that they have received from their own religious tradition.  The Christian faith is no exception to this pattern, and is even more affected by it because its transmssion relies on revelation that reason alone cannot measure. 

    The Eucharist contains the essential elements of a Christian response to the tragedy of a humanism that has lost its point of reference to the God who is creator and redeemer.  The Eucharist remembers God’s saving action.  The Eucharist brings to the world the gospel of Christ’ Peace.  The Eucharist teaches us that self-giving must be at the core of of our lives.

                            Lorette P. Nault