Home
Bulletin Letter
St. Paul Home
Calendar
Bulletins
Bulletin Letters
July 6, '08
June 29, '08
June 22, '08
June 15, '08
June 8, '08
June 1, '08
May 25, '08
May 18, '08
May 11, '08
May 4, '08
Apr. 27, '08
Apr. 20, '08
Apr. 13, '08
Apr. 6, '08
Mar. 30, '08
Mar. 23, '08
Mar. 16, '08
Mar. 9, '08
Mar. 2, '08
Fec. 24, '08
Fe. 17, '08
Feb. 10, '08
Feb. 3, '08
Jan. 27, '08
Jan. 20, '08
Jan. 13, '08
Jan. 6, '08
Dec. 23, '07
Dec. 16, '07
Dec. 9, '07
Dec. 2, '07
Nov. 25, '07
Nov. 18, '07
Nov. 11, '07
Nov. 4, '07
Oct. 28, '07
Oct. 21, '07
Oct. 14, '07
Oct. 7, '07
Sept. 30, '07
Sept. 23, '07
Sept. 16, '07
Sept. 9, '07
Sept. 2, '07
Aug. 26, '07
Aug. 19, '07
Aug. 12, '07
Aug. 5, '07
July 29, '07
July 22, '07
July 15, '07
July 8, '07
July 1, '07
June 24, '07
June 17, '07
June 10,  '07
June 3, 2007
May 27, 2007
May 20, 2007
May 13, 2007
May 6, 2007
April 29, 2007
April 22, 2007
April 15, 2007
April 8, 2007
April 1, 2007
Mar. 25, 2007
Mar. 18, 2007
Mar. 11, 2007
Mar. 4, 2007
Feb. 25, 2007
Feb. 18, 2007
Feb. 11, 2007
Feb. 4, 2007
Jan. 21, 2007
Jan 14, 2007
Jan. 7, 2007
Dec. 31, 2006
Dec. 24, 2006
Dec. 17, 2006
Dec. 10, 2006
Dec. 3, 2006
Nov. 26, 2006
Nov. 19, 2006
Nov. 12, 2006
Nov. 5, 2006
Oct. 29, 2006
Oct. 22, 2006
Oct. 15, 2006
Oct. 8, 2006
Oct. 1, 2006
Sept. 24, 2006
Sept. 17, 2006
Sept. 10, 2006
Sept. 3, 2006
Aug. 27, 2006
Aug. 20, 2006
Aug. 13, 2006
Aug. 6, 2006
July 30, 2006
July 23, 2006
July 16, 2006
July 9, 2006
July 2, 2006
June 25, 2006
June 18, 2006
June 11, 2006
June 4, 2006
May 28, 2006
May 21, 2006
May 14, 2006
May 7, 2006
Apr. 30, 2006
Apr. 23, 2006
Apr. 16, 2006
Apr. 9, 2006
Apr. 2, 2006
Mar. 26, 2006
Mar. 19, 2006
Mar. 12, 2006
Mar. 5, 2006
Feb. 26, 2006
Feb. 19, 2006
Feb. 12, 2006
Feb. 5, 2006
Jan. 29, 2006
Jan. 22, 2006
Jan. 15, 2006
Jan. 8, 2006
Jan. 1, 2006
Dec. 25, 2005
Dec. 18, 2005
Dec. 11, 2005
Dec. 4, 2005
Nov. 27, 2005
Nov. 20, 2005
Nov. 13, 2005
Nov. 6, 2005
Oct. 30, 2005
Oct. 23, 2005
Oct. 16, 2005
Oct. 9, 2005
Oct. 2, 2005
Sept. 25, 2005
Sept. 18, 2005
Sept. 11, 2005
Aug. 28, 2005
Aug. 21, 2005
Aug. 14, 2005
Aug. 7, 2005
July 31, 2005
July 24, 2005
June 26, 2005
June 19, 2005
June 12, 2005
June 5, 2005
May 29, 2005
May 22, 2005
May 15, 2005
May 8, 2005
May 1, 2005
April 24, 2005
April 17, 2005
April 10, 2005
April 3, 2005
March 27, 2005
March 20, 2005
March 13, 2005
March 6, 2005
Feb. 27, 2005
Feb. 20, 2005
Feb. 13, 2005
Feb. 6, 2005
Jan. 30, 2005
Jan. 23, 2005
Jan 16, 2005
Jan. 9, 2005

Pointing at the bulletin letter's date (link) at left will display it's title.
July 13, 2008

Being A Person for Others
                            
       A few weeks ago the News World lost one of its most distinguished and well known TV hosts namely, Tim Russert. The fact that Tim died so suddenly at still a rather young age, made the loss an even starker reality.  His passing brought to the fore a little known fact, at least to the outside world, that Tim was a good and practicing Catholic.  In the last issue of America, a weekly magazine written and published by the Jesuits, the editors found it appropriate to comment on Tim’s life.  The following is taken from this commentary. 

    Tim Russert was educated by Jesuits first at Canisius High School in Buffalo and John Carroll University in Cleveland.  Not only was Tim educated by Jesuits but the Jesuit “world” held him in very high esteem.  He was a recipient of honorary degrees from many of the 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the country.  Russert embodied a certain ideal of Jesuit education: the working-class youth who, through diligence and faith, contributes to his family, his church and the common good, while keeping a sense of humor, even about his own past as a Jesuit alumnus.  He delighted in recounting the comment of John Sturm, S.J.  Prefect of discipline at Canisius.  When the young Russert asked Father Sturm for mercy after a minor infraction, the prefect said, “Mercy is for God, I deliver justice!”

    The expression “Man for others” (or person for others) is a phrase often used to describe the ideal Jesuit alumnus or alumna.  Pedro Arrupe, S.J., who popularized the expression, meant it to be a challenge: it is not simply about “being nice” but being a person of self-sacrifice in the cause of justice who strives to emulate Christ in his labors and loves.  Russert exemplified this ideal in both his professional and personal life.  We pray that he will now enjoy God’s abundant love and, yes, mercy.  
  

    Besides the fact that Tim Russert is a good example of being a man of faith, dedicated to family, friends and yes, to his work, it is also noteworthy that Tim was able to balance all of these areas of his life and still maintain happiness and success.  This is probably the greatest  part of his legacy.  Tim Russert did not choose between his work and his family.  He did not choose between financial success and fidelity to his Catholic beliefs.  Clearly he did not feel that he had to live a compartmentalized or even a schizophrenic life as a “practicing” Catholic when at Mass and a popular and financially successful person at work.

    Perhaps we can take some time to reflect on this idea of being well balanced individuals.  The fast paced world we live in often tempts us to neglect our much needed balance in life.  We venture into the work arena totally absorbed in its intricacies not realizing that we are allowing this force to consume our being.  We quickly forget that we must remain totally intact.  We often allow the cultural and societal norms to dictate our life’s journey.  Consequently we often find ourselves unhappy. 

    Thanks to Tim Russert’s example we have been reminded that a Faith based life and personal success are not mutually exclusive concepts.  Thank You much Tim for all you’ve given this world in your life time.
                            Lorette P. Nault