Home
Bulletin Letter
St. Paul Home
Calendar
Bulletins
Bulletin Letters
July 20, '08
July 13, '08
July 6, '08
June 29, '08
June 22, '08
June 15, '08
June 8, '08
June 1, '08
May 25, '08
May 18, '08
May 11, '08
May 4, '08
Apr. 27, '08
Apr. 20, '08
Apr. 13, '08
Apr. 6, '08
Mar. 30, '08
Mar. 23, '08
Mar. 16, '08
Mar. 9, '08
Mar. 2, '08
Fec. 24, '08
Fe. 17, '08
Feb. 10, '08
Feb. 3, '08
Jan. 27, '08
Jan. 20, '08
Jan. 13, '08
Jan. 6, '08
Dec. 23, '07
Dec. 16, '07
Dec. 9, '07
Dec. 2, '07
Nov. 25, '07
Nov. 18, '07
Nov. 11, '07
Nov. 4, '07
Oct. 28, '07
Oct. 21, '07
Oct. 14, '07
Oct. 7, '07
Sept. 30, '07
Sept. 23, '07
Sept. 16, '07
Sept. 9, '07
Sept. 2, '07
Aug. 26, '07
Aug. 19, '07
Aug. 12, '07
Aug. 5, '07
July 29, '07
July 22, '07
July 15, '07
July 8, '07
July 1, '07
June 24, '07
June 17, '07
June 10,  '07
June 3, 2007
May 27, 2007
May 20, 2007
May 13, 2007
May 6, 2007
April 29, 2007
April 22, 2007
April 15, 2007
April 8, 2007
April 1, 2007
Mar. 25, 2007
Mar. 18, 2007
Mar. 11, 2007
Mar. 4, 2007
Feb. 25, 2007
Feb. 18, 2007
Feb. 11, 2007
Feb. 4, 2007
Jan. 21, 2007
Jan 14, 2007
Jan. 7, 2007
Dec. 31, 2006
Dec. 24, 2006
Dec. 17, 2006
Dec. 10, 2006
Dec. 3, 2006
Nov. 26, 2006
Nov. 19, 2006
Nov. 12, 2006
Nov. 5, 2006
Oct. 29, 2006
Oct. 22, 2006
Oct. 15, 2006
Oct. 8, 2006
Oct. 1, 2006
Sept. 24, 2006
Sept. 17, 2006
Sept. 10, 2006
Sept. 3, 2006
Aug. 27, 2006
Aug. 20, 2006
Aug. 13, 2006
Aug. 6, 2006
July 30, 2006
July 23, 2006
July 16, 2006
July 9, 2006
July 2, 2006
June 25, 2006
June 18, 2006
June 11, 2006
June 4, 2006
May 28, 2006
May 21, 2006
May 14, 2006
May 7, 2006
Apr. 30, 2006
Apr. 23, 2006
Apr. 16, 2006
Apr. 9, 2006
Apr. 2, 2006
Mar. 26, 2006
Mar. 19, 2006
Mar. 12, 2006
Mar. 5, 2006
Feb. 26, 2006
Feb. 19, 2006
Feb. 12, 2006
Feb. 5, 2006
Jan. 29, 2006
Jan. 22, 2006
Jan. 15, 2006
Jan. 8, 2006
Jan. 1, 2006
Dec. 25, 2005
Dec. 18, 2005
Dec. 11, 2005
Dec. 4, 2005
Nov. 27, 2005
Nov. 20, 2005
Nov. 13, 2005
Nov. 6, 2005
Oct. 30, 2005
Oct. 23, 2005
Oct. 16, 2005
Oct. 9, 2005
Oct. 2, 2005
Sept. 25, 2005
Sept. 18, 2005
Sept. 11, 2005
Aug. 28, 2005
Aug. 21, 2005
Aug. 14, 2005
Aug. 7, 2005
July 31, 2005
July 24, 2005
June 26, 2005
June 19, 2005
June 12, 2005
June 5, 2005
May 29, 2005
May 22, 2005
May 15, 2005
May 8, 2005
May 1, 2005
April 24, 2005
April 17, 2005
April 10, 2005
April 3, 2005
March 27, 2005
March 20, 2005
March 13, 2005
March 6, 2005
Feb. 27, 2005
Feb. 20, 2005
Feb. 13, 2005
Feb. 6, 2005
Jan. 30, 2005
Jan. 23, 2005
Jan 16, 2005
Jan. 9, 2005

Pointing at the bulletin letter's date (link) at left will display it's title.
July 27, 2008

The Conversion of St. Paul
                           
    St. Paul the Apostle and patron of our parish was born or Jewish parents or the tribe of Benjamin.  His parents were pharisees who lived in Cilicia, a province in the modern day Turkey.
After being educated by Gamaliel, a very knowledgeable and noble Jew and perhaps a member of the Sanhedrin, Paul also embraced the sect of the Pharisees which was of all others the most severe.  Here we see Paul’s determination and good will toward his faith in God.

    It did not take long for all to see that Paul surpassed all his equals in zeal for the Jewish law and their traditions, which he saw as the will of God.  It is with this perspective that Paul became a vicious persecutor and most outrageous enemy of Jesus, the Christ.  With permission from the High Priest, Paul would drag the Christians out of their houses, loaded them with chains, and throw them into prison.  Not only was Paul responsible for persecuting their faith and for harming them physically, he also seized their estates and what they possessed in common, leaving them in dire need.  This practice often backfired on Paul, however, because it forced the Christians to become stronger in their common life, giving them the opportunity to practice love for one an other. 

    Paul was aware that there was a large number of Christians in Damascus, in present day Syria.  Paul asked for permission to travel to Damascus in order to seek out all Christians in that city.  He would bind them in chains and drag them back to Jerusalem to make a public example to anyone who thought of becoming a Christian.  He was almost at the end of this journey when, about noon, he and his company were suddenly surrounded by a great light from heaven.  The light was so bright that everyone was struck with amazement and fell to the ground.  It was then that Paul heard a voice saying, “Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?”  In amazement Paul asked, “Who are you?”  The answer came, “I am Jesus of Nazareth whom you persecute.”  Then Paul asked, “Lord, what will you have me do?  How can I repair the past?”

    Once the light disappeared Paul realized he was blind.  He had to be lead to Damascus by his attendants.  He was brought to the home of a devote Jew where he stayed for three days fasting from food and drink.  God brought a devote Christian named Ananias to him in order to teach him the truths of the Christian faith.  It was during this time that Paul received God’s grace and had a complete change of heart.  From that day onward Paul never looked back but always focused his attention on the will of Christ.  All the zeal he had had as a Jew was transferred to the building of the new Christian church. 

    It is true that Paul’s conversion was very dramatic.  It is easy to see that it corresponded to Paul’s life and personality.  We must not focus all our attention on the story line and the drama however.  The importance of Paul’s conversion lies in the fact that God is the all powerful one in our lives, not us.  We are not the ones in charge.  No matter how proud we may be or how determined or zealous we are in our convictions, we must always be open to God’s grace in our lives.  We may not be thrown from our horse or blinded but then again, perhaps we could be.  How would we respond?  Are we ready to turn ourselves around and make a complete conversion, a change of heart for God’s purpose?
                            Lorette P. Nault